Oct 06, 2022

Regional event for East Africa: Beyond Food Crises

Type: Meeting
Location: Hybrid
Start Date: 06 Oct, 2022 08:00 AM
End Date: 07 Oct, 2022 02:00 PM
Timezone: GMT+03:00 Africa/Nairobi

Eastern Africa is facing the region's worst drought in 40 years. The 2022 IGAD Regional Focus of the Global Report on Food Crises alarms the unprecedented levels of acute food insecure populations. Approximately 50.8 million people are expected to be acutely food insecure, which marks a dramatic increase from 2021 when 42 million people suffered from food insecurity in 7 of the 8 Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) member states (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, and Uganda).

The 2022 regional report confirms that Eastern Africa accounted for nearly 22 percent of the global number of people in Crisis or worse, with an estimated 10 million children under the age of 5 suffering from malnutrition. In addition, 24 percent of the world’s 51 million internally displaced people were also in IGAD countries, mainly Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, and Sudan. The regional report also projected 50.3–50.8M people to face Crisis or worse (IPC Phase 3 or above) in 7 IGAD countries including 300 000 people projected to face Catastrophic conditions (IPC Phase 5) in Somalia and South Sudan, in 2022.

Recent global and regional events, including the IGAD Ministerial meetings on the ongoing food crises, have highlighted the political and financial commitments required to fight food crises in the region, and the need for improved coordinated and collective responses that layer and integrate short-term responses with long-term actions through the HDP approach.

Objective: Based on the IGAD Regional Focus of the Global Report on Food Crises 2022, the event will:

  • Present and discuss the regional food security situation
  • Solicit and promote actionable solutions aimed at strengthening food systems resilience specific to the Eastern Africa context, in line with global and regional commitments to fighting food crises.

Acknowledgements